Maybe this isn't for everybody.

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ladysnare Offline
noob
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Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 2:54 am

Maybe this isn't for everybody.

Posted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 6:24 am



What do you do for the person who just doesn't have it? One of my students (bottom bass drummer) just can't keep his feet in step with the other performers. He drags the rhythms. He constantly drops his hands after making contact with the bass drum head. He clearly wants to be a part of the line but you can easily tell he doesn't practice anything at home. An addition, he is close friends with the rest of the bass drummers so they all follow him. For instance, if he misses practice they all miss practice.


doublebassheeltoe Offline
Jeff Queen
Jeff Queen
Posts: 4006
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Erlanger, KY

Posted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 11:39 am



If it's to the point where the ENTIRE bass line is missing practice because of him, I would kick him out instantly. Maybe that's just because of the way my line is run though.
There's no way around reality, and there's no way to fix things that have already happened. It is what it is, we are what we are, and there is nothing more to life than that. Rule #9.


lhsdrummer91 Offline
paradiddler
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Joined: Wed May 28, 2008 7:14 pm
Location: South Carolina

Posted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 12:32 pm



altough i dont think punishment is something that should be enforced a lot, my freshman year when people couldn't keep up or joked around or w/e we had to run laps. we got our crap together really quick. me being a freshman on snare coming into a decent 5 person snare line was a big awakening. sometimes the best thing you can do is just push them to the limits. and as for the timing of the feet, when the drumline is playing, stand close by him and drive your own feet into the ground while clicking the gock block. this helps them visualize the relation between the sound they hear and the actual stomp. sometimes people wanna wait until they hear it to hit the ground but they have to understand that they need to sort of anticipate the beat. if the drumlines feet arent together, the drum major doesnt have a steady tempo to conduct to, and the band falls apart. plain and simple.


gafoo Offline
paradiddler
paradiddler
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Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:50 pm
Location: So Cal

Re: Maybe this isn't for everybody.

Posted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:40 am



ladysnare wrote:He clearly wants to be a part of the line but you can easily tell he doesn't practice anything at home.
You as an instructor need to realize that this statement is a contradiction. If it easy to tell that he doesn't practice ANYTHING at home, that should be a siren going off telling you that he DOESN'T want to be on the line.

Also, on the whole friends with the bass line thing, if any of my students pulled that on me, they would be out of the line...PERIOD!!! There is no excuse for something like that. Even as freshmen, I tell my students that I will treat them with the same respect they give to me and purposely missing rehearsal is showing the instructor no respect whatsoever.

So heres what I would do...

If this kid is really as bad as you say he is, kick this dude out of the line and make it perfectly clear to the rest of the bass line that they are free to follow him if they wish as you will just replace all their sorry *sses with people who actually want to be there.

This may seem harsh but teenagers will run over you if you don't make your expectations of them perfectly clear. Plus, sorry to say, but it sounds like this kid is already running the show if he has the bass line going along with him. These types of attitudes can quickly turn into a cancer that infects the entire line if they are not taken care of right away.

If he just has some trouble with the hands and the details (not fidgeting, keeping his sticks set, feet timing) then you need to find a way to teach him effectively. Often times, a grueling rehearsal in which you hammer home the basics is just what the doctor ordered. If you make your pursuit of perfection RELENTLESS then the kid will either fall in line and start making it happen or he will grow tired of it and quit anyway...problem solved.

Good luck.


doublebassheeltoe Offline
Jeff Queen
Jeff Queen
Posts: 4006
Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:28 pm
Location: Erlanger, KY

Posted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:46 am



Man, I absolutely agree with you. If all he needs is some fundamental work, then hammer it home. We spent three weeks playing in-out exercise for four bass rookies, and three weeks later they were marching and playing 32nds.
There's no way around reality, and there's no way to fix things that have already happened. It is what it is, we are what we are, and there is nothing more to life than that. Rule #9.


ladysnare Offline
noob
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Posts: 21
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 2:54 am

Posted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 9:26 am



Thanks guys, I needed another perspective on this.


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