New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

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Rosewood&Beads Offline
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New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 7:03 pm



So, the school I'm teching at this is their first year with a marching band. Obviously, it will be small and what not, but I'm not really sure what to do with the line. This is my first time instructing, and marching drums are really...not my forte. I'm a front ensemblist, that ended up with this gig. (Please no hating on me because of this, or telling me how I shouldn't, it is what it is.)
I'm writing a warm up book currently, and looking for suggestions for a technique packet?
Any and all suggestions, tips, and tricks and just general help will be more than welcomed!
Marching Band:
Tarpon Springs '09
Lakewood Ranch '10 '11
Indoor:
Manatee County Independent '11 '12
Drum Corps:
Tampa Bay Thunder DCA '11 '12
Marimba is my gig.

Warning! I enjoy saying controversial things. So, if you don't like what I say, keep calm and deal with it.


koopthepoopscoop Offline
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Joined: Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:47 pm
Location: Pennsylvania

Re:

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 7:09 pm



Absolute basic exercises you really need for a battery warm up packet:
8's
Tap Accent
Double Beat
Rolls

Some programs include a stick control exercise, a paradiddle exercise, flam exercises, and all kinds of other mumbo jumbo, but the most basic packets will include those 4. I'd say most important under those is a stick control exercise. Mallet player or not, I think you probably have enough knowledge to write out some basic forms of those 4 or 5 exercises.

As far as technique... You likely will not have an incredible amount of time to stress technique and uniformity to the point where they will play like a drum corps line. In most cases, a lot of students won't pay attention to a lengthy and in-depth technique packet anyway. As long as you're familiar with how to approach the drum and can demonstrate this in rehearsal, the best you can do beyond that in my opinion is just encourage a relaxed and legato approach that will facilitate playing.
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Kaitou Offline
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Re: New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:02 pm



koopthepoopscoop wrote:Absolute basic exercises you really need for a battery warm up packet:
8's
Tap Accent
Double Beat
Rolls
These are a must. I, too, would advise a stick control exercise (if you don't know http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsQ3qpNqnAw )

Decent technique videos (if you just want to get an idea)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBH9-cvrJVg - Snare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPO3_CVhddQ - Tenors

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_V2CU6tsOo - Basses

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPO3_CVhddQ - Cymbals

You also are going to need some kind of cadence. There are a plethora online if you don't want to write your own.

Also..some instructing tips
sxetnrdrmr wrote:When I assign people to positions in my line, I have had the most success with:

Snares: the people with the best rudimental knowledge and double control. I also use traditional so whoever has done the best with the traditional technique package I give out...more on that later if needed

Tenors: the fastest hands and the strongest bodies. Also, people with a decent knowledge of melodic phrasing. Not always drum set players, but more often than not...

Basses: I think this is the section where people make the most mistakes, and this can kill a band program. The number one thing NOT to do is put non-drummers, or the "kids without chops" on bass. There are soooooo many mechanical technique issues neede to play bass correctly that you can't have people with weak hands on bass. ALL of your bass drummers need to be THE BEST COUNTERS IN THE GROUP, especially if you play tonal parts.

Bass 1: usually my "extra snare/tenor" player. The kid with hands, but not enough to make the flat drums. Also, usually my best leader. Top bass is my "center"..all the others look up to her for hands interp as well as logistical stuff

Bass 2 and 4: my 2 best counters are on these drums since they tend to be the inner beats in splits. Bass 2 also is usually a "hands" person as well so I can split 3's and 4's between top 2

Bass 3: usually my youngest player. Parts tend to be on the beat; the drum is relatively light; easy drill spot;

Bass 5: Spankaphone! We use a 28" Pearl...it is a monster...so I usually have to really consider body strength here. Parts are not too bad...the end of phrases, not a lot of splits (unless they have hands)

Keyboards: obviously, people with previous board knowledge, but it itends to run the gammut of people who have played piano, guitar, don't want to march etc. Everyone in my line is required to take lessons from me, so none of my board players are "non-drummers".

Tymps: this depends. Most of the time it is a rookie player who I want to develop tymp technique with

Rack: usually my "greenest" person, which is funny cause mentally, rack is hard,

this is just how I do it at my school. Luckily, I get to knowm and start lessons with 99% of the kids in 7th grade so I can also "aim" them in a certain direction.


-----------

Another big thing is pacing the lesson time so that you hit everything you want, and she is entertained.

when I start kids I use 8 on a hand because it is instant success for them...they feel like they are playing the drum. It allows me to see basic motion, and describe basic motion to them.

I break my beginner lessons into 3 areas: Fundamental motion, rudiments and/or Stone patterns, and theory/application stuff...which is where the reading will come into play.

I always have them do Stone pattersn 1-4 - the 2 most basic stickings in drumming - at 80bpm. This, once again, usually allows them to feel like they are playing "stuff".

I have them do single paradiddles first. We start REAL slow, and I have them slowly build up tempo. I always model it first, going from slow to as fast as I can go, which creates a bit of a "wow" factor (not because I am a god drummer, but just because I am older). This motivates them to do it.

In the theory/reading time I either go over some theory stuff based on their level of knowledge, and also assign a piece to play that sort of sums up everything we are doing. (This is usually after about a month of basic stuff in lessons).

As far as books and materials go, I use all of the standard drum corps type warm-ups to begin with. I always have them get Stone Stick Control. I use either The Rudimental Cookbook, or Just Deserts - which I think is more friendly towards younger kids - for soloistic stuff. I reference Matt SAvages Rudimental Workshop as well as the Rudinmetal Logic book by Bachman. Garwood Whaleys "Fundamentals in Rhythms" is an awesome book of short basic rhythmic pieces to use, and then I follow up with Thom Hannums Check PAtterns book as they get older.

Have her bring a 3-ring binder with paper in it, and write down what you want her to do in lessons every week. That way, you both have a running tie line of what is happening. It will help you both remember what you are doing. I also have them put about 20 of those plastic page protectors in to hold all music and handouts they get.

--------------------------------------
Here is what I require of my center snare just for your info. Take what you want, leave what you want...

- Best hands in the line from a SOUND QUALITY stand point, NOT, just speed. The other snares need to listen in to replicate Centers sound.
- best hand and feet TIMING. The way we do it, the drum major watches center snares feet for time, so Centers feet set the time for the whole ensemble.
- BEST MUSICIAN. Not just drummer, but musician. They need to be able to "talk the talk" with the directors, hornline members, guard members, visual staff etc. They need to know the hornline score and understand how the drum book supports and works with the horn score from a musical standpoint.
- MOST ORGANIZED. Center knows all the music first, and is usually responsible for writing in stickings that I don't, or making what I write "better" within the given parameters (since i am "old and out of it" as they say). My center runs rehearsal when I am not there, and definitely runs snare micro-sectionals. Center defines everything for the snares: playing, attitude, sectional pride, how they look on and off the field, how they place equipment during practice
- Center is the ROLE MODEL in all aspects for the line (as are ALL of my leaders), not only in band, but in life. Center is never late; never forgets their stuff; stays eligeble grade-wise; (in our program) doesn't drink,smoke,do drugs etc...(that's a long story in and of itself for a later thread); is not in trouble with the law etc.; doesn't miss things b/c they are grounded
- Most knowledgeable about THE NON-MUSICAL aspects of drumming. My center is always there way before everyone else. They monitor the tuning and maintenance of all the snares. They know and understand the history of the activity - DCI etc. - and how it relates to what we are doing. They know and understand the visual side of things.
- MOST CHARISMATIC. Center HAS to be liked by everyone so that they will do what he asks if needed. My center is usually a "schmoozer", and is comfortable with everyone on the field - students and staff.
----------------------------------
reasons to require a hat:
1. it keeps the sun out of their eyes, and also keeps the sun off their heads
2. it replicates having their shakos on, and puts them in "game face" mode
3. for the battery, I use the facing of the brims to make sure they are projecting where they should be. i can scan the field, even from the farthest distance, and tell whether they are looking and listening where they should be
4. it becomes a "Sectional pride" thing, where each section all gets the same kind of hat
5. we also have the "Tick Hat", which is a 15 year old, absolutely disgusting, hard, sweat stained, smelly old hat. If you are ticking, you get to wear the Tick Hat until you stop.

- they are never allowed on the field without their hat - just like a football player always wears their helmet, even during non contact drills - it "separates" you from work time and play time. The helmet/hat goes on and nothing outside of the helmet matters. The brims are down like the shakos sort of looking "BA"...it becomes a mind set thing. A focus thing.
--------------------------------
Stuff to have

- DEFINITELY have the Camelback...I would have the kids get them too if you can. They are a god-send. You can hydrate in small sips in whatever time intervals you want...because it is on your back. They fit under carrier bars...they have completely changed the way I time practice now. No more 15 minute water breaks, They gushing as they are going.
- if possible, have a cooler filled with ice and small towels. Leave the towels in the ice and as it melts the towels get wet and cold. Then they can drape them on the backs of their necks at break, and go back out with them for some goo dcooling. Also keep fruits in the cooler for energy on breaks. We use clemetines and apples. Also get some spray bottles and fill them up to "mist" peoples faces during short breaks. My bass section leader started this last year...great idea
- have a large bottle of Aloe for the ones who think they are impervious to the sun..and for the gingers and WASP's like me! I am either pasty white or 3rd degree burned...no inbetween
- have them all bring a beach towel to cover their drum heads in the heat when the drums are not on, and to cover themselves on break if there is no shade
- speaking of no shade, one or two of those tent things you can set up in a minute are the best investment behind the Camelback...instant shade. i think you can get them for $30 a pop at some plces like Target or Home Depot
- stress to EVERYONE, including your emo and Goth kids, as well as the G's and fashionista girls that regular athletic shorts are going to be the best choice for that week. NO ONE wants that painful rash in between the legs in the crotch area due to ill fitting pants and no air getting up there
Good luck man
TA67 wrote:She walked over to me and said "I formally request that you turn my body into a playground of lust and wonder, o burly man." To which I agreed. I laid her down on the desk, and well...we both got As for the entire semester as a result.
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bug1580 Offline
playin' eights
playin' eights
Posts: 54
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2011 8:32 pm

Re: New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:51 pm



Check this out -

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/percu ... rching.php

Basic exercises in the downloadable packet, plus videos with explanations on lots of useful topics. A great starting place. Good luck!


Rosewood&Beads Offline
noob
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Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 1:42 am
Location: Fort Myers, Florida

Re:

Posted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 10:56 pm



Thanks to everyone for the help!! It's really appreciated!
Marching Band:
Tarpon Springs '09
Lakewood Ranch '10 '11
Indoor:
Manatee County Independent '11 '12
Drum Corps:
Tampa Bay Thunder DCA '11 '12
Marimba is my gig.

Warning! I enjoy saying controversial things. So, if you don't like what I say, keep calm and deal with it.


sxetnrdrmr Offline
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Location: chasing the battery around the field

Re: New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

Posted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 9:31 am



Kaitou wrote:
Also..some instructing tips
sxetnrdrmr wrote:When I assign people to positions in my line, I have had the most success with:

Snares: the people with the best rudimental knowledge and double control. I also use traditional so whoever has done the best with the traditional technique package I give out...more on that later if needed

Tenors: the fastest hands and the strongest bodies. Also, people with a decent knowledge of melodic phrasing. Not always drum set players, but more often than not...

Basses: I think this is the section where people make the most mistakes, and this can kill a band program. The number one thing NOT to do is put non-drummers, or the "kids without chops" on bass. There are soooooo many mechanical technique issues neede to play bass correctly that you can't have people with weak hands on bass. ALL of your bass drummers need to be THE BEST COUNTERS IN THE GROUP, especially if you play tonal parts.

Bass 1: usually my "extra snare/tenor" player. The kid with hands, but not enough to make the flat drums. Also, usually my best leader. Top bass is my "center"..all the others look up to her for hands interp as well as logistical stuff

Bass 2 and 4: my 2 best counters are on these drums since they tend to be the inner beats in splits. Bass 2 also is usually a "hands" person as well so I can split 3's and 4's between top 2

Bass 3: usually my youngest player. Parts tend to be on the beat; the drum is relatively light; easy drill spot;

Bass 5: Spankaphone! We use a 28" Pearl...it is a monster...so I usually have to really consider body strength here. Parts are not too bad...the end of phrases, not a lot of splits (unless they have hands)

Keyboards: obviously, people with previous board knowledge, but it itends to run the gammut of people who have played piano, guitar, don't want to march etc. Everyone in my line is required to take lessons from me, so none of my board players are "non-drummers".

Tymps: this depends. Most of the time it is a rookie player who I want to develop tymp technique with

Rack: usually my "greenest" person, which is funny cause mentally, rack is hard,

this is just how I do it at my school. Luckily, I get to knowm and start lessons with 99% of the kids in 7th grade so I can also "aim" them in a certain direction.


-----------

Another big thing is pacing the lesson time so that you hit everything you want, and she is entertained.

when I start kids I use 8 on a hand because it is instant success for them...they feel like they are playing the drum. It allows me to see basic motion, and describe basic motion to them.

I break my beginner lessons into 3 areas: Fundamental motion, rudiments and/or Stone patterns, and theory/application stuff...which is where the reading will come into play.

I always have them do Stone pattersn 1-4 - the 2 most basic stickings in drumming - at 80bpm. This, once again, usually allows them to feel like they are playing "stuff".

I have them do single paradiddles first. We start REAL slow, and I have them slowly build up tempo. I always model it first, going from slow to as fast as I can go, which creates a bit of a "wow" factor (not because I am a god drummer, but just because I am older). This motivates them to do it.

In the theory/reading time I either go over some theory stuff based on their level of knowledge, and also assign a piece to play that sort of sums up everything we are doing. (This is usually after about a month of basic stuff in lessons).

As far as books and materials go, I use all of the standard drum corps type warm-ups to begin with. I always have them get Stone Stick Control. I use either The Rudimental Cookbook, or Just Deserts - which I think is more friendly towards younger kids - for soloistic stuff. I reference Matt SAvages Rudimental Workshop as well as the Rudinmetal Logic book by Bachman. Garwood Whaleys "Fundamentals in Rhythms" is an awesome book of short basic rhythmic pieces to use, and then I follow up with Thom Hannums Check PAtterns book as they get older.

Have her bring a 3-ring binder with paper in it, and write down what you want her to do in lessons every week. That way, you both have a running tie line of what is happening. It will help you both remember what you are doing. I also have them put about 20 of those plastic page protectors in to hold all music and handouts they get.

--------------------------------------
Here is what I require of my center snare just for your info. Take what you want, leave what you want...

- Best hands in the line from a SOUND QUALITY stand point, NOT, just speed. The other snares need to listen in to replicate Centers sound.
- best hand and feet TIMING. The way we do it, the drum major watches center snares feet for time, so Centers feet set the time for the whole ensemble.
- BEST MUSICIAN. Not just drummer, but musician. They need to be able to "talk the talk" with the directors, hornline members, guard members, visual staff etc. They need to know the hornline score and understand how the drum book supports and works with the horn score from a musical standpoint.
- MOST ORGANIZED. Center knows all the music first, and is usually responsible for writing in stickings that I don't, or making what I write "better" within the given parameters (since i am "old and out of it" as they say). My center runs rehearsal when I am not there, and definitely runs snare micro-sectionals. Center defines everything for the snares: playing, attitude, sectional pride, how they look on and off the field, how they place equipment during practice
- Center is the ROLE MODEL in all aspects for the line (as are ALL of my leaders), not only in band, but in life. Center is never late; never forgets their stuff; stays eligeble grade-wise; (in our program) doesn't drink,smoke,do drugs etc...(that's a long story in and of itself for a later thread); is not in trouble with the law etc.; doesn't miss things b/c they are grounded
- Most knowledgeable about THE NON-MUSICAL aspects of drumming. My center is always there way before everyone else. They monitor the tuning and maintenance of all the snares. They know and understand the history of the activity - DCI etc. - and how it relates to what we are doing. They know and understand the visual side of things.
- MOST CHARISMATIC. Center HAS to be liked by everyone so that they will do what he asks if needed. My center is usually a "schmoozer", and is comfortable with everyone on the field - students and staff.
----------------------------------
reasons to require a hat:
1. it keeps the sun out of their eyes, and also keeps the sun off their heads
2. it replicates having their shakos on, and puts them in "game face" mode
3. for the battery, I use the facing of the brims to make sure they are projecting where they should be. i can scan the field, even from the farthest distance, and tell whether they are looking and listening where they should be
4. it becomes a "Sectional pride" thing, where each section all gets the same kind of hat
5. we also have the "Tick Hat", which is a 15 year old, absolutely disgusting, hard, sweat stained, smelly old hat. If you are ticking, you get to wear the Tick Hat until you stop.

- they are never allowed on the field without their hat - just like a football player always wears their helmet, even during non contact drills - it "separates" you from work time and play time. The helmet/hat goes on and nothing outside of the helmet matters. The brims are down like the shakos sort of looking "BA"...it becomes a mind set thing. A focus thing.
--------------------------------
Stuff to have

- DEFINITELY have the Camelback...I would have the kids get them too if you can. They are a god-send. You can hydrate in small sips in whatever time intervals you want...because it is on your back. They fit under carrier bars...they have completely changed the way I time practice now. No more 15 minute water breaks, They gushing as they are going.
- if possible, have a cooler filled with ice and small towels. Leave the towels in the ice and as it melts the towels get wet and cold. Then they can drape them on the backs of their necks at break, and go back out with them for some goo dcooling. Also keep fruits in the cooler for energy on breaks. We use clemetines and apples. Also get some spray bottles and fill them up to "mist" peoples faces during short breaks. My bass section leader started this last year...great idea
- have a large bottle of Aloe for the ones who think they are impervious to the sun..and for the gingers and WASP's like me! I am either pasty white or 3rd degree burned...no inbetween
- have them all bring a beach towel to cover their drum heads in the heat when the drums are not on, and to cover themselves on break if there is no shade
- speaking of no shade, one or two of those tent things you can set up in a minute are the best investment behind the Camelback...instant shade. i think you can get them for $30 a pop at some plces like Target or Home Depot
- stress to EVERYONE, including your emo and Goth kids, as well as the G's and fashionista girls that regular athletic shorts are going to be the best choice for that week. NO ONE wants that painful rash in between the legs in the crotch area due to ill fitting pants and no air getting up there
Good luck man
thanks Kaitou....you did all the work for me :wink:
Iv'e got sXe!!!!
NAATD!!!!
Up the Antix!!!!

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Kaitou Offline
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Re: New Marching Band, New Instructor...Help.

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:45 pm



sxetnrdrmr wrote:
Kaitou wrote:
Also..some instructing tips
sxetnrdrmr wrote:When I assign people to positions in my line, I have had the most success with:

Snares: the people with the best rudimental knowledge and double control. I also use traditional so whoever has done the best with the traditional technique package I give out...more on that later if needed

Tenors: the fastest hands and the strongest bodies. Also, people with a decent knowledge of melodic phrasing. Not always drum set players, but more often than not...

Basses: I think this is the section where people make the most mistakes, and this can kill a band program. The number one thing NOT to do is put non-drummers, or the "kids without chops" on bass. There are soooooo many mechanical technique issues neede to play bass correctly that you can't have people with weak hands on bass. ALL of your bass drummers need to be THE BEST COUNTERS IN THE GROUP, especially if you play tonal parts.

Bass 1: usually my "extra snare/tenor" player. The kid with hands, but not enough to make the flat drums. Also, usually my best leader. Top bass is my "center"..all the others look up to her for hands interp as well as logistical stuff

Bass 2 and 4: my 2 best counters are on these drums since they tend to be the inner beats in splits. Bass 2 also is usually a "hands" person as well so I can split 3's and 4's between top 2

Bass 3: usually my youngest player. Parts tend to be on the beat; the drum is relatively light; easy drill spot;

Bass 5: Spankaphone! We use a 28" Pearl...it is a monster...so I usually have to really consider body strength here. Parts are not too bad...the end of phrases, not a lot of splits (unless they have hands)

Keyboards: obviously, people with previous board knowledge, but it itends to run the gammut of people who have played piano, guitar, don't want to march etc. Everyone in my line is required to take lessons from me, so none of my board players are "non-drummers".

Tymps: this depends. Most of the time it is a rookie player who I want to develop tymp technique with

Rack: usually my "greenest" person, which is funny cause mentally, rack is hard,

this is just how I do it at my school. Luckily, I get to knowm and start lessons with 99% of the kids in 7th grade so I can also "aim" them in a certain direction.


-----------

Another big thing is pacing the lesson time so that you hit everything you want, and she is entertained.

when I start kids I use 8 on a hand because it is instant success for them...they feel like they are playing the drum. It allows me to see basic motion, and describe basic motion to them.

I break my beginner lessons into 3 areas: Fundamental motion, rudiments and/or Stone patterns, and theory/application stuff...which is where the reading will come into play.

I always have them do Stone pattersn 1-4 - the 2 most basic stickings in drumming - at 80bpm. This, once again, usually allows them to feel like they are playing "stuff".

I have them do single paradiddles first. We start REAL slow, and I have them slowly build up tempo. I always model it first, going from slow to as fast as I can go, which creates a bit of a "wow" factor (not because I am a god drummer, but just because I am older). This motivates them to do it.

In the theory/reading time I either go over some theory stuff based on their level of knowledge, and also assign a piece to play that sort of sums up everything we are doing. (This is usually after about a month of basic stuff in lessons).

As far as books and materials go, I use all of the standard drum corps type warm-ups to begin with. I always have them get Stone Stick Control. I use either The Rudimental Cookbook, or Just Deserts - which I think is more friendly towards younger kids - for soloistic stuff. I reference Matt SAvages Rudimental Workshop as well as the Rudinmetal Logic book by Bachman. Garwood Whaleys "Fundamentals in Rhythms" is an awesome book of short basic rhythmic pieces to use, and then I follow up with Thom Hannums Check PAtterns book as they get older.

Have her bring a 3-ring binder with paper in it, and write down what you want her to do in lessons every week. That way, you both have a running tie line of what is happening. It will help you both remember what you are doing. I also have them put about 20 of those plastic page protectors in to hold all music and handouts they get.

--------------------------------------
Here is what I require of my center snare just for your info. Take what you want, leave what you want...

- Best hands in the line from a SOUND QUALITY stand point, NOT, just speed. The other snares need to listen in to replicate Centers sound.
- best hand and feet TIMING. The way we do it, the drum major watches center snares feet for time, so Centers feet set the time for the whole ensemble.
- BEST MUSICIAN. Not just drummer, but musician. They need to be able to "talk the talk" with the directors, hornline members, guard members, visual staff etc. They need to know the hornline score and understand how the drum book supports and works with the horn score from a musical standpoint.
- MOST ORGANIZED. Center knows all the music first, and is usually responsible for writing in stickings that I don't, or making what I write "better" within the given parameters (since i am "old and out of it" as they say). My center runs rehearsal when I am not there, and definitely runs snare micro-sectionals. Center defines everything for the snares: playing, attitude, sectional pride, how they look on and off the field, how they place equipment during practice
- Center is the ROLE MODEL in all aspects for the line (as are ALL of my leaders), not only in band, but in life. Center is never late; never forgets their stuff; stays eligeble grade-wise; (in our program) doesn't drink,smoke,do drugs etc...(that's a long story in and of itself for a later thread); is not in trouble with the law etc.; doesn't miss things b/c they are grounded
- Most knowledgeable about THE NON-MUSICAL aspects of drumming. My center is always there way before everyone else. They monitor the tuning and maintenance of all the snares. They know and understand the history of the activity - DCI etc. - and how it relates to what we are doing. They know and understand the visual side of things.
- MOST CHARISMATIC. Center HAS to be liked by everyone so that they will do what he asks if needed. My center is usually a "schmoozer", and is comfortable with everyone on the field - students and staff.
----------------------------------
reasons to require a hat:
1. it keeps the sun out of their eyes, and also keeps the sun off their heads
2. it replicates having their shakos on, and puts them in "game face" mode
3. for the battery, I use the facing of the brims to make sure they are projecting where they should be. i can scan the field, even from the farthest distance, and tell whether they are looking and listening where they should be
4. it becomes a "Sectional pride" thing, where each section all gets the same kind of hat
5. we also have the "Tick Hat", which is a 15 year old, absolutely disgusting, hard, sweat stained, smelly old hat. If you are ticking, you get to wear the Tick Hat until you stop.

- they are never allowed on the field without their hat - just like a football player always wears their helmet, even during non contact drills - it "separates" you from work time and play time. The helmet/hat goes on and nothing outside of the helmet matters. The brims are down like the shakos sort of looking "BA"...it becomes a mind set thing. A focus thing.
--------------------------------
Stuff to have

- DEFINITELY have the Camelback...I would have the kids get them too if you can. They are a god-send. You can hydrate in small sips in whatever time intervals you want...because it is on your back. They fit under carrier bars...they have completely changed the way I time practice now. No more 15 minute water breaks, They gushing as they are going.
- if possible, have a cooler filled with ice and small towels. Leave the towels in the ice and as it melts the towels get wet and cold. Then they can drape them on the backs of their necks at break, and go back out with them for some goo dcooling. Also keep fruits in the cooler for energy on breaks. We use clemetines and apples. Also get some spray bottles and fill them up to "mist" peoples faces during short breaks. My bass section leader started this last year...great idea
- have a large bottle of Aloe for the ones who think they are impervious to the sun..and for the gingers and WASP's like me! I am either pasty white or 3rd degree burned...no inbetween
- have them all bring a beach towel to cover their drum heads in the heat when the drums are not on, and to cover themselves on break if there is no shade
- speaking of no shade, one or two of those tent things you can set up in a minute are the best investment behind the Camelback...instant shade. i think you can get them for $30 a pop at some plces like Target or Home Depot
- stress to EVERYONE, including your emo and Goth kids, as well as the G's and fashionista girls that regular athletic shorts are going to be the best choice for that week. NO ONE wants that painful rash in between the legs in the crotch area due to ill fitting pants and no air getting up there
Good luck man
thanks Kaitou....you did all the work for me :wink:
When I told you I made it a habit of saving your posts I was being serious haha 8)
TA67 wrote:She walked over to me and said "I formally request that you turn my body into a playground of lust and wonder, o burly man." To which I agreed. I laid her down on the desk, and well...we both got As for the entire semester as a result.
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