Tenors, Height, and Weight

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Girl Offline
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Tenors, Height, and Weight

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 5:10 pm



Hello I am an incoming High School Sophomore. I'm 5'5, weight about 125 lbs, and I'm a girl, the only girl in my high school battery and was the shortest one of all. I tried out for tenors this year, and I made it. But my mom is worried about me having back problems later in life because of this. I marched 2nd bass last year, but I really do want to march Tenors! My friend who marched Tenors for the same high school for 2 years and is now a Sophomore in college, said they are not ass heavy as you might think, bit I rememebered him he's 6 ft tall and stronger than me. I was in soccer for 4 years, and is always active but I am a bit scared and worried I won't be able to march Tenors the right way :| The Tenors we march are about 50 - 60lbs, So any tips maybe? Someone as tiny as me and about my weight maybe has marched them and has some suggestions? I'm scared but happy at the same time.


joe356 Offline
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Re: Tenors, Height, and Weight

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:05 pm



First of all, I'd be surprised if the tenors your school marches weigh 60lbs. Unless they're a significantly older model, I'd guess they're more in the ballpark of 35-40. Dynasty's tenors are generally considered to be the heaviest on the market, and the heaviest configuration clocks in around 35 lbs pre-carrier.

Second, while you're not the typical build, your far from the smallest person I've seen march tenors. If you take care of your body, work on some core exercises and maintain good form, there's no reason why you shouldn't be able to get through a season without any problems. Its all about building the correct muscles, and maintaining good posture. Just like any other form of physical work, you have to maintain your form to avoid injury. You also have to listen to your body. There's a difference between pain that means you're building muscle, and pain that says "stop that, you're hurting me". Only you will know the difference there.


Girl Offline
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Re:

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:41 pm



Thank you :D , and our tenors are Peral, my friend descibed them as "DCI" Tenors, they are longer and heavier than the "High school" Tenors. This Tenors we are marching are 6 years old I believe, but yeah they are heavier than the Yamaha I have been practicing on.


joe356 Offline
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Re: Re:

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 7:30 pm



Girl wrote:Thank you :D , and our tenors are Peral, my friend descibed them as "DCI" Tenors, they are longer and heavier than the "High school" Tenors. This Tenors we are marching are 6 years old I believe, but yeah they are heavier than the Yamaha I have been practicing on.
Yeah, I'd guess your tenors are in the 35ish lbs range. What he probably means by saying "DCI Tenors" is that they are full sized, which many high schools also use. The Pearls, if I remember correctly, are a hair lighter than the Dynastys.

Just be prepared for a lot of hard work, and you should be fine.


doublebassheeltoe Offline
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Re: Tenors, Height, and Weight

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 8:07 pm



My best friend is a 5'1", 90 pound female who carried a 45 pound set of Pearl tenors her senior year of high school. You'll be fine.

As an FYI I carried a 55 pound set of Pearls (with carrier, and that weight was verified; it was a really old set) for three years at 5'10", 145 pounds, without issue. Moved to a 35 pound set of brand new Yamahas and my back instantly told me to go fluff myself. When it comes to a person's ability to carry drums, it usually has little to do with the weight of the drum itself and more to do with how the equipment fits your body. If you have a really nice carrier that fits your body well and holds the drums nice and flat, you're golden. With that being said, I've had Yamaha snares that felt heavier than my Pearl tenors, even though that is obviously not the case. Yamaha is just no bueno with hardware.

This is the more important question - what kind of carrier will you be using with those drums? Is it an actual Pearl carrier or is it one of Randall May's carriers? If it's a Randall May, is it a vest carrier or a tube carrier? Vest carriers aren't adjustable except for the J bars. That's what I had my first year and it sucked pretty hardcore. As long as you have a Randall May tube carrier or a Pearl carrier, you should be good. I would NOT under any circumstances, with your height, recommend carrying a set of tenors with a vest carrier. Forget about your back, your hips will be toast.

When it comes to carrying the drums and pain, I liked to use this as my indicator: if the pain comes on gradually, you're fine. If you have a sharp pain that occurs suddenly, you need to drop those drums right now. The fact that you're marching Pearl allows me to breathe a sigh of relief. Pearls handle really well.
There's no way around reality, and there's no way to fix things that have already happened. It is what it is, we are what we are, and there is nothing more to life than that. Rule #9.


Girl Offline
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Re:

Posted: Sun Aug 03, 2014 10:10 pm



Thank you guys a lot, I feel way better now c:, the harness is pearl though. I'm looking foward to band camp tomorrow :3


doublebassheeltoe Offline
Jeff Queen
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Re:

Posted: Mon Aug 04, 2014 1:49 pm



Just remember, proper posture is going to be key with keeping your body intact. I don't recommend taking "leaning breaks", where you lean with the drum on to rest your back. If you are going to lean with the drums on, lean slightly backward and for no more than ten seconds. Don't bend your back when you pick up your drums - practice proper lifting technique just like with any heavy object. Put your carrier on first, then put your drums on your body. Lock your arms in and lift with your legs. Stretch for at least fifteen minutes before each rehearsal block, if your group doesn't already. Focus on stretching your spine and your hamstrings. Think about the soft space between the bottom of your rib cage and the top of your hips as a soft cushion between your upper and lower bodies. Always be conscious of that space and do what you can to make that space bigger. Keep your five points in line (ears, shoulders, hips, knees, ankles) and perpendicular to the ground at all times.

Make sure that your carrier is set up the correct way before you ever put the drums on. Set your carrier to your own body without the drums - the back bar should be even with the hinges for the shoulder bars. The stomach pad should sit on your stomach, and nowhere else - especially not the hips. If you have to choose between having the stomach pad too high or too low, I've always preferred to go higher toward the chest just to keep all that weight off the hips. Then you can put the drums on and see how everything feels with the weight on, and adjust the J bars (and only the J bars!) to get the height of the drums where you need it.

If you can follow all of those steps from day one, I think you've pretty much ruled out any possibility of a back injury. I went my first two years of tenor drummin', as well as two years of bassin' (on first and second, albeit) without ever knowing anything about this stuff.
There's no way around reality, and there's no way to fix things that have already happened. It is what it is, we are what we are, and there is nothing more to life than that. Rule #9.


Tinyperson Offline
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Re: Tenors, Height, and Weight

Posted: Mon Jan 01, 2018 9:31 pm



I think I must be the smallest and lightest person to attempt to play tenors...
I am a girl of 82 pounds and 4’10, and I want to play tenors next year. The tenors we have are 58 lbs. I also haven’t been growing much lately, and I think I’m nearing my final height. I can lift and carry the tenors, and I may have the stamina for it, but I do have jeuvenile arthritis. Any tips on how to overcome this?


Ken Speranza Offline
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Re: Tenors, Height, and Weight

Posted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:46 am



Hey! The tips posted above are still very relevant for you. ESPECIALLY the leaning thing. My freshman year I was initially supposed to march snare. Besides the fact that I couldnt play rolls for my life, my posture was terrible. I ended up getting a little bit of scoliosis from all the leaning/bending I did. Over the years I exercised more and my back got stronger, and now I'm able to hold the snare with ease. Moral of the story: your back is gonna ache when you wear the drum. Fight through it. If you get lazy, you're back is gonna be screwed up and you might not be able to march tenors at all. If you keep yourself motivated to keep the drums up and your posture good, I promise you they'll be a piece of cake next year.
Palm Beach Gardens High School 2014-2018
Center Snare

John I. Leonard High School (Indoor Partners) 2018
Snare


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