Music Colleges

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MurvulDrummer_17 Offline
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Music Colleges

Posted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 8:43 pm



I know it's kinda early for me to be thinking about this, but what are some good music colleges? I've heard Belmont and the U of Tennessee are good, but what others?
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:01 pm



MurvulDrummer_17 wrote:I know it's kinda early for me to be thinking about this, but what are some good music colleges? I've heard Belmont and the U of Tennessee are good, but what others?

Depends on what you want to go to music for.

Berklee, University of North Texas, University of Michigan, Juilliard, Yale, John Hopkins, UMASS, etc.


Too many to name. Your best best is to practice your butt off and then travel around to some schools to see what is going to "fit" you and your needs.

Some schools don't focus in marching percussion, others do. It all depends. Also, those schools aren't going to be cheap and are extremely competitive, but it will help you tremendously with the contacts you will build and they will benefit you. The world is all about politics and who you know. If you can make it into one of their programs and then go on to a Masters degree, you will have a lot of opportunities the average person will not get.

In the meantime, practice your butt off. Become profficent in marching, orchestral drumming. Also spend lots of time on Marimba, Timpani, and piano. Take as many music therory courses as you can to help you persue a music career, they will be required when you go to college, might as well start now.


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:25 pm



MTSU has a really good music/percussion program
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Re:

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:43 am



no matter what...

1. make sure you can sight read. This is usually the make or break part of ANY college audition regardless of level or major track

2. TAKE PRIVATE LESSONS. You MUST have consistent individual commentary on your playing to get the edge you need, and also to make things much easier on you.

3. learn to play ALL percussion instruments, not just one. If you are a monster snare player, and have no clue about tambourine technique, you are most likely 'out"

4. music theory!!!! Get going on this now.

5. make sure you are involved in AS MANY music ensembles as you can in HS...marching/concert/jazz, pit orchestra, indoor...whatever. You will have to have a "music resume" that shows what you have participated in for some colleges. The ywill determine your level of "seriousness" by this.

6. participate in solo and ensemble. Preparing a solo is almost EXACTLY like the audition process, and it looks good on your music resume as well.

7. go to summer camps and other clinics and get to know people in the professional level of our activity. Shake hands, participate. Leave an impression


if you take these steps, then you are preparing yourself pretty much for most places regardless of what they offer. As mentioned, many college offer many different things. There are very few colleges that will offer intense instruction in the marching arts since it is still not considered a "legitimate" part of the activity yet (don't get me started on that...)
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hurt-a Offline
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Re: Re:

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:01 pm



sxetnrdrmr wrote:no matter what...

1. make sure you can sight read. This is usually the make or break part of ANY college audition regardless of level or major track

2. TAKE PRIVATE LESSONS. You MUST have consistent individual commentary on your playing to get the edge you need, and also to make things much easier on you.

3. learn to play ALL percussion instruments, not just one. If you are a monster snare player, and have no clue about tambourine technique, you are most likely 'out"

4. music theory!!!! Get going on this now.

5. make sure you are involved in AS MANY music ensembles as you can in HS...marching/concert/jazz, pit orchestra, indoor...whatever. You will have to have a "music resume" that shows what you have participated in for some colleges. The ywill determine your level of "seriousness" by this.

6. participate in solo and ensemble. Preparing a solo is almost EXACTLY like the audition process, and it looks good on your music resume as well.

7. go to summer camps and other clinics and get to know people in the professional level of our activity. Shake hands, participate. Leave an impression


if you take these steps, then you are preparing yourself pretty much for most places regardless of what they offer. As mentioned, many college offer many different things. There are very few colleges that will offer intense instruction in the marching arts since it is still not considered a "legitimate" part of the activity yet (don't get me started on that...)
Awesome advice. And DRESS UP!! Someone who graduated from my school last year didn't and he didn't make it. Shirt and tie will do nicely.
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Re: Re:

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:21 pm



hurt-a wrote:
sxetnrdrmr wrote:no matter what...

1. make sure you can sight read. This is usually the make or break part of ANY college audition regardless of level or major track

2. TAKE PRIVATE LESSONS. You MUST have consistent individual commentary on your playing to get the edge you need, and also to make things much easier on you.

3. learn to play ALL percussion instruments, not just one. If you are a monster snare player, and have no clue about tambourine technique, you are most likely 'out"

4. music theory!!!! Get going on this now.

5. make sure you are involved in AS MANY music ensembles as you can in HS...marching/concert/jazz, pit orchestra, indoor...whatever. You will have to have a "music resume" that shows what you have participated in for some colleges. The ywill determine your level of "seriousness" by this.

6. participate in solo and ensemble. Preparing a solo is almost EXACTLY like the audition process, and it looks good on your music resume as well.

7. go to summer camps and other clinics and get to know people in the professional level of our activity. Shake hands, participate. Leave an impression


if you take these steps, then you are preparing yourself pretty much for most places regardless of what they offer. As mentioned, many college offer many different things. There are very few colleges that will offer intense instruction in the marching arts since it is still not considered a "legitimate" part of the activity yet (don't get me started on that...)
Awesome advice. And DRESS UP!! Someone who graduated from my school last year didn't and he didn't make it. Shirt and tie will do nicely.
That was straight retarded of him. If you're trying to sell yourself, ALWAYS look your best.
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Re: Re:

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 6:21 pm



Cubee wrote:
hurt-a wrote:
sxetnrdrmr wrote:no matter what...

1. make sure you can sight read. This is usually the make or break part of ANY college audition regardless of level or major track

2. TAKE PRIVATE LESSONS. You MUST have consistent individual commentary on your playing to get the edge you need, and also to make things much easier on you.

3. learn to play ALL percussion instruments, not just one. If you are a monster snare player, and have no clue about tambourine technique, you are most likely 'out"

4. music theory!!!! Get going on this now.

5. make sure you are involved in AS MANY music ensembles as you can in HS...marching/concert/jazz, pit orchestra, indoor...whatever. You will have to have a "music resume" that shows what you have participated in for some colleges. The ywill determine your level of "seriousness" by this.

6. participate in solo and ensemble. Preparing a solo is almost EXACTLY like the audition process, and it looks good on your music resume as well.

7. go to summer camps and other clinics and get to know people in the professional level of our activity. Shake hands, participate. Leave an impression


if you take these steps, then you are preparing yourself pretty much for most places regardless of what they offer. As mentioned, many college offer many different things. There are very few colleges that will offer intense instruction in the marching arts since it is still not considered a "legitimate" part of the activity yet (don't get me started on that...)
Awesome advice. And DRESS UP!! Someone who graduated from my school last year didn't and he didn't make it. Shirt and tie will do nicely.
That was straight retarded of him. If you're trying to sell yourself, ALWAYS look your best.
He wasn't one to dress up for anything really.
Legends DBC Front Ensemble
2013- Aux
2014- Vibraphone
2015- Marimba
Spirit Snare 80 wrote:Cowbell- "WHACK-WHACK-WHACK-WHACK"......Spaaaalat. "Cut!" Do it again!


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Wed May 01, 2013 8:51 am



I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Eastman (Michael Burritt) or Oberlin (Michael Rosen) yet. Granted, they are definitely concert/orchestral based, and don't have marching bands/drumlines. However, for a while, when John H. Beck was teaching, Eastman was one of the the standards for percussion schools. As for universities, University of Kentucky (James Campbell) has a very good and large percussion studio.

+1 for getting involved in as many ensembles as you can. You may have to search for a while, or drive for an hour to get to them, but they are worth it in the long run. I was looking at the questionnaire for one conservatory, and they asked specifically which Youth Orchestra the applicant was in (as if everyone has the opportunity to be in a youth orchestra).


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Wed May 01, 2013 9:01 am



If you're wanting to be a general musician, go to whatever fits your needs the most. But if you want to be a percussionist, DEFINITELY go to Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. The drumline is superior to 99.9% of colleges out there, and the instructional staff have tons of experience and expertise. You should check them out
High School
OHS Drumline 2008 (Bass 4): When You Wish Upon A Star
OHS Drumline 2009 (Snare): The Greatest Show On Turf
OHS Drumline 2010 (Snare): Cars
OHS Drumline 2011 (Tenors): The British Invasion
WWHS Drumline 2012 and 2013 (Instructor)

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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:37 pm



Shame about the spambot, but I actually do have something to add to this thread:

Don't rule out smaller schools. Yeah, the huge schools like UNT are great places to go, and you will definitely get a good education. But there's something to be said for having 12 people in your music theory 101 class, as opposed to 100+
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 1:40 am



Northwestern has she-e wu who is a god. Oregon has Pius chung if you enjoy him. You should decide on whatever instructor they have. Because going to that school is basically going to build your biggest foundation so have the foundation of whoever you like. So go on youtube and hitup everyone. But also if you plan on going to Graduate school and more, just think about money. Graduate would be where you fine tune and shtuff.


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:18 pm



JSU in alabama, FSU, UGA... honestly, most big universities have good music courses and bands because they're so big, but if you want a degree, jsu is the best i know of.
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:31 pm



TheKingofNone wrote:JSU in alabama, FSU, UGA... honestly, most big universities have good music courses and bands because they're so big, but if you want a degree, jsu is the best i know of.
This, great school with great percussionist and drumline.
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:38 pm



Lee clary wrote:
TheKingofNone wrote:JSU in alabama, FSU, UGA... honestly, most big universities have good music courses and bands because they're so big, but if you want a degree, jsu is the best i know of.
This, great school with great percussionist and drumline.
CVBass2 wrote:If you're wanting to be a general musician, go to whatever fits your needs the most. But if you want to be a percussionist, DEFINITELY go to Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. The drumline is superior to 99.9% of colleges out there, and the instructional staff have tons of experience and expertise. You should check them out
I don't mean to nitpick, cause i know you guys are like 16 and in HS. but...


I'm not a music major by any means, but the quality of the drumline has little to no bearing on the quality of the music degree offered by the school.

Most schools with very highly regarded music programs have terrible to mediocre drumlines at best, which are composed of mostly kids outside of the music program. I renember when i went around to all the schools in TX when i was looking at colleges, and all of the programs that were very highly regarded for music essentially told me that I woulden't be in the marching band if i was doing a music major, and/or the marching band was full of people studying other things. Mainly cause degrees are hard, and (regardless of what i believe) I've been told majoring in music sucks up a ton of your time, being in other ensembles and such.

of the last 3 drumlines I've performed in, all of whom were DCI/WGI finalists, maybe 10% or less of the people on the physical drumline were majoring in music (at least in percussion anyway). In the last 4 basslines I've been in, we've had 1 music major (whom currently has his PhD, and did a grand total of 2 seasons of marching band before calling it quits) most of us were engineers or finance guys. most people you guys watch on youtube lot videos are not majoring in anything remotely related to band in any way.

The most relevant factors that typically determine the quality of a university drumline are location and the quality of the music programs in the local primary schools (hence why MI, TX, IN, FL, and CA tend to have very good drumlines) large state schools tend to attract enough decent players to make a good program anyway, regardless of the music program.
'10 '11 '12 '13

'09 '10 '11 '13


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:43 pm



MPolarinakis wrote:
Lee clary wrote:
TheKingofNone wrote:JSU in alabama, FSU, UGA... honestly, most big universities have good music courses and bands because they're so big, but if you want a degree, jsu is the best i know of.
This, great school with great percussionist and drumline.
CVBass2 wrote:If you're wanting to be a general musician, go to whatever fits your needs the most. But if you want to be a percussionist, DEFINITELY go to Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. The drumline is superior to 99.9% of colleges out there, and the instructional staff have tons of experience and expertise. You should check them out
I don't mean to nitpick, cause i know you guys are like 16 and in HS. but...


I'm not a music major by any means, but the quality of the drumline has little to no bearing on the quality of the music degree offered by the school.

Most schools with very highly regarded music programs have terrible to mediocre drumlines at best, which are composed of mostly kids outside of the music program. I renember when i went around to all the schools in TX when i was looking at colleges, and all of the programs that were very highly regarded for music essentially told me that I woulden't be in the marching band if i was doing a music major, and/or the marching band was full of people studying other things. Mainly cause degrees are hard, and (regardless of what i believe) I've been told majoring in music sucks up a ton of your time, being in other ensembles and such.

of the last 3 drumlines I've performed in, all of whom were DCI/WGI finalists, maybe 10% or less of the people on the physical drumline were majoring in music (at least in percussion anyway). In the last 4 basslines I've been in, we've had 1 music major (whom currently has his PhD, and did a grand total of 2 seasons of marching band before calling it quits) most of us were engineers or finance guys. most people you guys watch on youtube lot videos are not majoring in anything remotely related to band in any way.

The most relevant factors that typically determine the quality of a university drumline are location and the quality of the music programs in the local primary schools (hence why MI, TX, IN, FL, and CA tend to have very good drumlines) large state schools tend to attract enough decent players to make a good program anyway, regardless of the music program.
Okay, I'm most definitely not 16, nor am I in high school... And have no idea why you say such a thing. Also, JSU has an excellent music program AND an excellent drumline. One who assumes they are not good have obviously never seen them. They currently have a lot of people in their percussion section marching top 12 corps, I believe.
High School
OHS Drumline 2008 (Bass 4): When You Wish Upon A Star
OHS Drumline 2009 (Snare): The Greatest Show On Turf
OHS Drumline 2010 (Snare): Cars
OHS Drumline 2011 (Tenors): The British Invasion
WWHS Drumline 2012 and 2013 (Instructor)

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Atlanta CV 2013 (Bass 2): Carpe Caelum

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MPolarinakis Offline
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:26 am



CVBass2 wrote:
MPolarinakis wrote:
Lee clary wrote:[you guys are like 16 and in HS. but...


I'm not a music major by any means, but the quality of the drumline has little to no bearing on the quality of the music degree offered by the school.

Most schools with very highly regarded music programs have terrible to mediocre drumlines at best, which are composed of mostly kids outside of the music program. I renember when i went around to all the schools in TX when i was looking at colleges, and all of the programs that were very highly regarded for music essentially told me that I woulden't be in the marching band if i was doing a music major, and/or the marching band was full of people studying other things. Mainly cause degrees are hard, and (regardless of what i believe) I've been told majoring in music sucks up a ton of your time, being in other ensembles and such.

of the last 3 drumlines I've performed in, all of whom were DCI/WGI finalists, maybe 10% or less of the people on the physical drumline were majoring in music (at least in percussion anyway). In the last 4 basslines I've been in, we've had 1 music major (whom currently has his PhD, and did a grand total of 2 seasons of marching band before calling it quits) most of us were engineers or finance guys. most people you guys watch on youtube lot videos are not majoring in anything remotely related to band in any way.

The most relevant factors that typically determine the quality of a university drumline are location and the quality of the music programs in the local primary schools (hence why MI, TX, IN, FL, and CA tend to have very good drumlines) large state schools tend to attract enough decent players to make a good program anyway, regardless of the music program.
Okay, I'm most definitely not 16, nor am I in high school... And have no idea why you say such a thing. Also, JSU has an excellent music program AND an excellent drumline. One who assumes they are not good have obviously never seen them. They currently have a lot of people in their percussion section marching top 12 corps, I believe.
Obviously the two arnt mutually exclusive, but OP asked for a music school, and the only info you guys said was "go here! They had a good Drumline"

Also I tend to just assume everyone here is 16. My B.

Also sorry about quotes. It's really hard to delete sections of text from my phone
'10 '11 '12 '13

'09 '10 '11 '13


for clarification, see related GIF
Image


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:34 am



They should make a SnareScience app!!
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Re:

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 1:51 pm



Michigan State has a great orchestral and marching percussion program. ( marching wise ) Their drumline is absolutely fantastic.

Oh and University of Michigan has a great jazz percussion program.
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 1:55 pm



michigan state also has great jazz program
I play and teach music (sometimes even band music!)

I work in music tech and licensing.

Music is an art and positive energy.


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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 3:46 pm



MPolarinakis wrote:
Lee clary wrote:
TheKingofNone wrote:JSU in alabama, FSU, UGA... honestly, most big universities have good music courses and bands because they're so big, but if you want a degree, jsu is the best i know of.
This, great school with great percussionist and drumline.
CVBass2 wrote:If you're wanting to be a general musician, go to whatever fits your needs the most. But if you want to be a percussionist, DEFINITELY go to Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. The drumline is superior to 99.9% of colleges out there, and the instructional staff have tons of experience and expertise. You should check them out
I don't mean to nitpick, cause i know you guys are like 16 and in HS. but...


I'm not a music major by any means, but the quality of the drumline has little to no bearing on the quality of the music degree offered by the school.

Most schools with very highly regarded music programs have terrible to mediocre drumlines at best, which are composed of mostly kids outside of the music program. I renember when i went around to all the schools in TX when i was looking at colleges, and all of the programs that were very highly regarded for music essentially told me that I woulden't be in the marching band if i was doing a music major, and/or the marching band was full of people studying other things. Mainly cause degrees are hard, and (regardless of what i believe) I've been told majoring in music sucks up a ton of your time, being in other ensembles and such.

of the last 3 drumlines I've performed in, all of whom were DCI/WGI finalists, maybe 10% or less of the people on the physical drumline were majoring in music (at least in percussion anyway). In the last 4 basslines I've been in, we've had 1 music major (whom currently has his PhD, and did a grand total of 2 seasons of marching band before calling it quits) most of us were engineers or finance guys. most people you guys watch on youtube lot videos are not majoring in anything remotely related to band in any way.

The most relevant factors that typically determine the quality of a university drumline are location and the quality of the music programs in the local primary schools (hence why MI, TX, IN, FL, and CA tend to have very good drumlines) large state schools tend to attract enough decent players to make a good program anyway, regardless of the music program.
On the other hand, some schools will require for you to be in their marching program for x years if you are studying to be a music educator.


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Re: Re:

Posted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 10:30 am



luciddrumman wrote:Michigan State has a great orchestral and marching percussion program. ( marching wise ) Their drumline is absolutely fantastic.

Oh and University of Michigan has a great jazz percussion program.
there are schools who have both solid marching lines, and traditional programs - Michigan State being a very good example of that.

As Mpolarinakis mentioned though, in many schools, the percussion majors are not able to do marching band because the MB practice schedule interferes with their required performance groups practice schedules. Also in very many schools, there is also (stupid) political things going on between the MB and the traditional music schools that prevent the kids from doing both. This kind of stuff drives me nuts - where the Trad program thinks that it is more "legit" - than the MB program. Granted, some MB programs still give the impression that the kids are just beating the crap out of the drums and there is no percussion education going on, but many are also very forward thinking anymore because it is the right and sensible thing to do.

I DEFINITELY feel like any Music Ed major should be required to do MB at least one semester in their career since they will most likely have to deal with MB in their job at least once.
Iv'e got sXe!!!!
NAATD!!!!
Up the Antix!!!!

ImageImage

Image

Its' All about the Parking Lot - Watterson Drumline
www.bishopwattersondrumline.webs.com
OSUMB Tenor tech
Pearl
Zildjian
Innovative Percussion
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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 1:14 pm



for example, where I went to school was a top percussion program in the country where music ed majors had to do marching band for one year. Most performance majors didn't have time for marching band. However, Tom Float teaches the drumline and they're good, as far as college lines go
I play and teach music (sometimes even band music!)

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Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 3:59 pm



I'm not a music major, but here's my two cents:

If you are not a music major, and just want a quality drumline to be part of in college, check out the audition requirements for joining the program. Some schools have a 'Show up and you're in' kind of attitude, whereas others have a very strict audition process (Prepared solo, sight reading, marching audition, etc.) Generally speaking, the more practice you have to do for the audition, the more challenging the music you will be asked to perform throughout the season, and the better instruction you'll get.

Visit the school, and meet the instructors, if possible. Directors are usually happy to meet with (or email) prospective students, and they can tell you all about the program and answer any specific questions you may have.

Also, find out the amount of time commitment you will have to make to be a part of the program. Often the drumline will have extra rehearsals that may or may not be on the band's official schedule (I found this one out the hard way, so be sure to ask someone at the school before you schedule classes for your first semester.)

Finally, go to youtube and watch videos of the band and see if you could picture yourself in that group doing what they're doing. There are a huge variety of college marching bands and music programs out there, so chances are you'll find a program that is the right fit for you, no matter your major.
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Reservoir HS '09-'12
Penn State Blue Band '12-Present


UHSnare45 Offline
Jeff Queen
Jeff Queen
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Location: SS

Re:

Posted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:21 pm



When I was looking (me being a performance major) I looked at the quality of the teacher/program in the orchestral part of it, over the quality of the drumline. If the drumline is good, it's icing on top. But I didn't exclude a school just because it had a mediocre drumline. I looked for the teacher. Whoever said Michigan State and Kentucky those are both good schools if you have to have a both a good studio and good drumline. Campbell is a boss, too bad I didn't get any scholarships.

My advice go to the school with the teacher you want to learn from.
UHS-Snare '09-'12(SL)
AAMB 2013 - Snare


Randall112 Offline
chops master
chops master
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Joined: Sat Aug 21, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Re: Music Colleges

Posted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:35 pm



Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA has a great percussion department. It is widely overlooked by out of state students
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