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AP Music Theory

Posted: Tue Jan 10, 2012 6:44 pm
by RyanCHS93
I'm taking this class this year and its my first time taking an AP class. I'm having a lot of trouble with harmonic dictation. I can do melodic dictation pretty well, but with harmonic dictation, it seems almost impossible to get. Any of you guys have trouble with this as well? How would I be able to work on it to get better?

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:49 am
by DrummerFox1
Practicing yourass off. Try getting a music theory app, those are pretty helpful and conveniant. And if you have a piano, practice any intervals you have trouble with and drill them hard.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 8:02 pm
by TheKingofNone
Well, at this point you've already finished it... I've been a pianist for nearly 9 years, and have been studying theory for nearly as long. Would you recommend this class, if I had to take it online?

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sat Jul 06, 2013 8:44 pm
by AlexSkov
TheKingofNone wrote:Well, at this point you've already finished it... I've been a pianist for nearly 9 years, and have been studying theory for nearly as long. Would you recommend this class, if I had to take it online?

I am not sure how much I would recommend it online. If you can, try and take it in person. I think that with music theory having an instructor that answers questions and can explain things more in depth would be better. However, I would recommend taking AP music theory because it helps you to analyze music better. Also, with all of the theory courses I have taken, I can tell that I listen to music much better and can recognize the chords they use and how they all fit together. For some, it may seem hard at first, but as you start to understand more and more of it, it will become much easier. If you need help with any of it feel free to ask me questions, I would be glad to help.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:32 pm
by TheKingofNone
AlexSkov wrote:
TheKingofNone wrote:Well, at this point you've already finished it... I've been a pianist for nearly 9 years, and have been studying theory for nearly as long. Would you recommend this class, if I had to take it online?

I am not sure how much I would recommend it online. If you can, try and take it in person. I think that with music theory having an instructor that answers questions and can explain things more in depth would be better. However, I would recommend taking AP music theory because it helps you to analyze music better. Also, with all of the theory courses I have taken, I can tell that I listen to music much better and can recognize the chords they use and how they all fit together. For some, it may seem hard at first, but as you start to understand more and more of it, it will become much easier. If you need help with any of it feel free to ask me questions, I would be glad to help.
Thanks. Unfortunately, we don't have enough people interested to have a class. However, my piano teacher lady person has like thirty music degrees, so I think I'll be ok. Do you think it is worth it if you have no interest in a music degree?

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 5:33 pm
by Hertaz
For anyone who is interested in being a music major: be forewarned that passing the AP music theory class will more than likely not give you college credit. Your university will probably give credit for a music theory class aimed more towards non-majors or minors instead of the classes required for your program.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:27 pm
by Cubee
Hertaz wrote:For anyone who is interested in being a music major: be forewarned that passing the AP music theory class will more than likely not give you college credit. Your university will probably give credit for a music theory class aimed more towards non-majors or minors instead of the classes required for your program.
Even still, I imagine going into your freshman theory courses with the background knowledge from AP Theory would be very helpful.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:50 pm
by Hertaz
Cubee wrote:
Hertaz wrote:For anyone who is interested in being a music major: be forewarned that passing the AP music theory class will more than likely not give you college credit. Your university will probably give credit for a music theory class aimed more towards non-majors or minors instead of the classes required for your program.
Even still, I imagine going into your freshman theory courses with the background knowledge from AP Theory would be very helpful.

Oh definitely, I'm sorry if it seemed like I was telling people to avoid the AP class.... certainly not my intention. The class itself is very helpful, but I wouldn't bank your first semester schedule on passing the AP exam because most schools won't give you credit for it.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:57 am
by MPolarinakis
TheKingofNone wrote:Well, at this point you've already finished it... I've been a pianist for nearly 9 years, and have been studying theory for nearly as long. Would you recommend this class, if I had to take it online?
You technically don't need to take any classes, you pay (or your school pays) for you to take the test, the classes offered by the HS are there to help you get ready. Just buy a review book and make sure you're passing the tests in the back and you know how it works before you opt not to take a class, most of the AP I took, I did by myself, and it worked out pretty well.

The class itself is a very basic introduction to comp and basic theory, with some singing thrown In

The test consists of ....

a singing section, where you sight sing 2 short parts
A transcription part, where you're given a starting pitch and write down a melody from a recording (you get 2 listens I think)
And some figured bass/harmonic dictation sections, where you write a functional melody based on a few given notes
(Other *beep* too, but it's easy)

The multiple choice basically asks you basic comp questions and basic theory questions.

My class didn't cover the material and I got a 4 (5 on the written, 2 on the singing cause I can't sing)

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:11 pm
by TheKingofNone
MPolarinakis wrote:
TheKingofNone wrote:Well, at this point you've already finished it... I've been a pianist for nearly 9 years, and have been studying theory for nearly as long. Would you recommend this class, if I had to take it online?
You technically don't need to take any classes, you pay (or your school pays) for you to take the test, the classes offered by the HS are there to help you get ready. Just buy a review book and make sure you're passing the tests in the back and you know how it works before you opt not to take a class, most of the AP I took, I did by myself, and it worked out pretty well.

The class itself is a very basic introduction to comp and basic theory, with some singing thrown In

The test consists of ....

a singing section, where you sight sing 2 short parts
A transcription part, where you're given a starting pitch and write down a melody from a recording (you get 2 listens I think)
And some figured bass/harmonic dictation sections, where you write a functional melody based on a few given notes
(Other *beep* too, but it's easy)

The multiple choice basically asks you basic comp questions and basic theory questions.

My class didn't cover the material and I got a 4 (5 on the written, 2 on the singing cause I can't sing)
The thing is, if I take it I'm not taking the test. And I'm pretty solid with harmonics, notation, etc. But If I do take it it will be taken with a few other difficult courses, including AP US History and Amer. Lit. But good job, man. I can't sing worth a crap either xD

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 5:29 pm
by roastduck
TheKingofNone wrote: The thing is, if I take it I'm not taking the test. And I'm pretty solid with harmonics, notation, etc. But If I do take it it will be taken with a few other difficult courses, including AP US History and Amer. Lit. But good job, man. I can't sing worth a crap either xD
In my opinion, taking the class and not taking the test is a bad idea. It's especially bad if your school is going to pay the test fee for you. The test will give you college credit, and even if you don't major in music in college, it might still count as a fine arts elective.

When I took AP US History, my parents decided, for some reason, that it wouldn't be a good idea for me to take the test. then I get into college and my advisor asks why I didn't take the test, because if I had, I wouldn't have had to take the TWO history classes I ended up taking.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Wed Jul 10, 2013 10:00 am
by TheKingofNone
Its just a single case. The school doesn't pay, and whether or not I get the credit I plan on taking fine arts throughout college. I mean, if I take it it will be along with AP Physics, Calculus, and Computer Science. It'll be a good GPA booster, but that's just another $90 wasted, in my opinion. It's just me, though.

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 10:31 am
by MPolarinakis
TheKingofNone wrote:Its just a single case. The school doesn't pay, and whether or not I get the credit I plan on taking fine arts throughout college. I mean, if I take it it will be along with AP Physics, Calculus, and Computer Science. It'll be a good GPA booster, but that's just another $90 wasted, in my opinion. It's just me, though.
Which physics? Cause B was painfully easy and C is probably the most difficult AP exam offered.

It looks good on a resume. It also depends what you're majoring in, music theory does nothing for my degree but it probably looks good on an app. to music schools.

I would highly recommend not getting a music degree as well unless you want to be a band director. It's not exactly the easiest thing to find work in, and most of the guys who get hired full time that I see around the places I've lived have technical degrees unrelated to music, but are good teachers and have loads of experience in different ensembles

Re: AP Music Theory

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2013 4:35 pm
by hotbeats645
Really, it's all about who you know and what you know. Plenty of people are successful with degrees, but just as many have made their own paths.